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Microscopes

"Long ago, in the hazy unrecorded past, someone picked up a piece of transparent crystal thicker in the middle than at the edges, looked through it, and discovered that it made things look larger. Someone also found that such a crystal would focus the sun's rays and set fire to a piece of parchment or cloth" I copied this paragraph on internet. It cannot be said better.

The optical microscope manipulates beams of light to produce magnification. When the features of a studied object are less than a few microns, diffraction takes over; light goes around such features. Electrons have associated wave length smaller than one amstrong and difraction become a problem only for features less than one amstrong or so. Actualy our transmition electron microscope have a resolution of 4 nanometers. Check the link below to see our electron microscope.

Transmission Electron Microscope

The Bausch & Lomb Excelsior Pocket Microscope

Excelsior

In 1877, The American Agriculturist announced that every subscriber could receive a microscope with their 1878 subscription for an additional 40 cents. Non-subscribers could purchase the microscope for $1.50. The publisher claimed that 125,000 of these hard rubber stand, 3 lens microscopes were manufactured for the 1878 mailing.

Agriculturist

Disecting2

A quantum lip; from carefully polished and coated lenses that can magnify structures as small as 500 nm to the electron microscope that can have a resolution as good as 0.1nm. When I decided to go to Winnipeg on a -25C day, to dismantle and package an obsolete electron transmission microscope, scheduled to be trashed, I was not sure how many people were laughing. It was a wild idea which, in retrospective, I am proud of. Here it is at the right: our Philips 420 EM -complete;4nm resolution.

 

A simple microscope with interchangeable lenses by John J. Bausch known as “Excelsior Pocket Microscope”. In June 9, 1874 patent # 151746 under the name: “Improvement I Microscopes” was awarded

Excelsior microscope patent

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R&JBeck model 2115. Special order for McGill Univ

philips420

 

 

 

 

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